On what basis can a person be declared right in God’s sight?

9Marks
Not by our works: The Bible teaches that there is no way we can be declared righteous in God’s sight by doing good works (Rom. 3:19-20). We can’t fulfill God’s law (Rom. 8:5-8). We can’t live in a way that is pleasing to God and so earn a righteous status in God’s sight. We deserve only condemnation.

What is the place of good works in salvation?

9Marks
The short answer: The Reformers summarized the Bible’s teaching on this subject by saying that we are justified (counted righteous in God’s sight) by faith alone, but the faith that justifies is never alone. Justified by faith alone…: We are justified by faith apart from works of the law (Rom.3:28). God counts us as righteous because he credits the very righteousness of Christ tous (Phil. 3:9, Rom. 5:17). All this happens by faith alone, apart from any good works we do (Rom. 4:4-5).

Is repentance necessary for salvation?

9Marks
The claim: Some people say that you can believe in Jesus as “Savior” but not as “Lord.” That is, you can believe in him but never repent of your sin. You can believe in him and be saved even if your life goes on just as it was before you became a Christian. Or so the claim goes.

Is faith in Christ the only way to be saved?

9Marks
The cultural challenge: People today love to be inclusive. We want everybody to be right. In fact we think that the only way to be wrong is to think that anyone could ever be wrong about anything. So when it comes to religion we say, “All paths lead to God. There’s no one right way. The right thing to believe is whatever works for you.” But is that what the Bible says?

Is conscious faith in Christ necessary for salvation?

9Marks
The question: What about those people who live in some far corner of the world and have never heard the gospel? Will they be saved if they “live up to” the knowledge of God they naturally have? Can they be “anonymous Christians” who somehow believe in Jesus even though they’ve never heard of him? Or is conscious faith in Christ necessary for salvation?

Does the gospel include the transformation of society?

9Marks

The gospel is the good news that Jesus Christ came into the world to save sinners by living in their place, dying in their place to bear God’s wrath against their sins, and rising from the grave in order to give his people eternal life and usher in a new creation.

What is “the gospel of the kingdom”?

9Marks

It’s very popular these days to talk about “the gospel of the kingdom.”

Many people claim that when Jesus came “preaching the gospel of the kingdom” (Matt. 4:23) he was preaching a message about the overthrow of evil government powers, the transformation of society, and the lifting up of the poor. All kinds of revolutionaries can get behind these ideas.

But is that what the Bible means when it speaks about the gospel of the kingdom? Not exactly.

How does the gospel address both guilt and shame?

9Marks

Some church leaders today argue that the gospel addresses shame rather than guilt. Or they say that shame is a more primary category in Scripture and that we should de-emphasize the idea of guilt when we share the gospel.

What’s the most fundamental problem the gospel addresses?

9Marks
Is the gospel fundamentally about meeting our needs? Fulfilling our desire for meaning? Transforming society? Teaching us to live better lives? Lifting up the poor? Making us rich and healthy? All of these ideas about the gospel latch onto a perceived problem and say, “That’s what the gospel is all about!” But are any of those things what the gospel is all about? Are any of those things the fundamental problem the gospel addresses?

Is there a contradiction between God’s love and wrath?

9Marks

Have you ever heard the following? “God is love! He would never judge anyone or send anyone to hell! That’s just not loving!” Pitting God’s love against God’s wrath is as common these days as the biblical illiteracy which feeds such a sentiment.

What is sin?

9Marks
Sin is fundamentally rebellion against God (Rom. 1:18-32). Sin is refusing to acknowledge God as God and putting ourselves in the place of God. Sin is any act that does not wholly conform to the will and law of God (1 Jn. 3:4).

Does God promise Christians material wealth and physical health in this life?

9Marks

In the gospel, God gives us every spiritual blessing in the heavenly places in Christ (Eph. 1:3): we’re made righteous in his sight, freed from slavery to sin, given the Holy Spirit to dwell in us, adopted into God’s family, and ultimately given eternal life.

What is the difference between a man-centered gospel and the true gospel?

9Marks

There are countless man-centered “gospels” on offer today. Such “gospels” say things like, “God wants to make you rich and prosperous in this life,” or “God wants to heal you of every physical and emotional ailment,” or “God wants to provide for whatever needs you feel you have.”

But how do these man-centered gospels differ from the true, biblical, God-centered gospel?

Is penal substitutionary atonement central to the gospel or just one of many metaphors?

9Marks

Some scholars and church leaders argue that penal substitutionary atonement—the doctrine that when Jesus died on the cross God punished him for the sins of his people, in whose place he stood—is at best one scriptural metaphor among many. Such teachers argue that we should push penal substitution to the sidelines of the gospel message.

What content is necessary in order to share the gospel?

9Marks

In order to share the gospel you must tell someone the truth about